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Dating for students

In some instances, the victims, usually teenage girls, receive as many as 40 texts a day with negative messages from their partner.

Other times, the abuser may violate their partner's privacy by breaking into their e-mail or checking their phone.

The abusive teens may also monitor their partners' behaviors on social media sites such as Facebook and My Space.

Jennings said social networking, which can connect hundreds and thousands of students, gives the abusive partner more leverage.

With access to so many friends online, the abuser can post a damaging message online about their significant other or make threats to do so.

It's the coercion and control that borders on real-world violence." And sometimes, the abuse involves the exchange of racy photos, a practice called sexting.

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The humiliation can be lasting for a teenager, said Parry Aftab, founder of the internet bullying advocacy group, Wired Safety.She has heard of cases where the abusive partner may take the partner's password to check up on him or her routinely.

"Tell somebody they trust and try to get help because you can't go through it yourself," she said.She recently graduated from community college with a degree in elementary education.Therapy and time has helped her move past the digital abuse she endured.Yes/No; While it is free to use, POF offers premium services as part of their upgraded membership, such as seeing the date and time a user viewed your profile and allowing you to see whether a user read and/or deleted your message.(CNN) -- There were no scars, no bruises to indicate the abuse Allyson Pereira, a 16-year-old high school sophomore in New Jersey, had suffered. She said he gave her an offer: Text him a naked picture of herself, and he would get back together with her. Pereira, who was featured in the MTV anti-digital dating abuse campaign, "A Thin Line," in December, has been speaking out against the growing problem of digital dating abuse among teens."It's the phenomenon of no place to run and no place to hide," Jennings says. You can't even see your predator coming." Jill Murray, a psychotherapist in California who has worked with victims of teen dating abuse, says almost all her new cases in the past three years involve technology.