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Dating between different races

Overall increases in intermarriage have been fueled in part by rising intermarriage rates among black newlyweds and among white newlyweds.

By Gretchen Livingston and Anna Brown In 1967, when miscegenation laws were overturned in the United States, 3% of all newlyweds were married to someone of a different race or ethnicity.

Since then, intermarriage rates have steadily climbed.

This marks a change from 1980, when there were virtually no educational differences in the likelihood of intermarriage among newlyweds.

The same patterns and trends emerge when looking separately at newlywed men and women; there are no overall gender differences in intermarriage by educational attainment.

By 1980, the share of intermarried newlyweds had about doubled to 7%. All told, more than 670,000 newlyweds in 2015 had recently entered into a marriage with someone of a different race or ethnicity.

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In 2015, 26% of recently married Hispanic men were married to a non-Hispanic, as were 28% of their female counterparts.These intermarriage rates have changed little since 1980.

However, rates of intermarriage increase as education levels rise for both the U. born and the foreign born: Among immigrant Hispanic newlyweds, intermarriage rates range from 9% among those with a high school diploma or less up to 33% for those with a bachelor’s degree or more; and among the U. born, rates range from 32% for those with a high school diploma or less up to 56% for those with a bachelor’s degree or more.The same was true in 1980, when 4% of recently married men and 4% of recently married women had intermarried.As is the case among whites, intermarriage is about equally common for newlywed Hispanic men and women.Perhaps more striking – the share of blacks in the marriage market has remained more or less constant (15% in 1980, 16% in 2015), yet their intermarriage rate has more than tripled.While there is no overall gender difference in intermarriage among newlyweds, starkly different gender patterns emerge for some major racial and ethnic groups.The share has tripled since 1980, when 3% of married people – about 3 million altogether – had a spouse of a different race or ethnicity.